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Stormwater

STORMWATER MANAGEMENT

Folsom’s Public Works Department handles all stormwater management issues for the City, from design and construction of the storm drain system to operation and maintenance, and urban runoff pollution prevention.

Contact Us:

Drainage Operations and Maintenance (916) 355-8344

Drainage Engineering and Stormwater Quality Program
Sarah Staley, P.E. (916) 351-3545

E-mail: sstaley@folsom.ca.us

To report illegal dumping into storm drains,
please call (916) 808-4H20 (4420)
or 24-hr non-emergency Police Dispatch (916) 355-7231
.

Hot Topics

For a review of some of the most popular topics, click on the links below:


Folsom's Watersheds

In Folsom, a handful of creeks - Willow, Humbug, Hinkle and Alder - take water from our properties and roads and deliver that water directly to the American River.  From there, it travels to the Sacramento River and eventually makes its way to the Pacific Ocean.  Your neighborhood is located in one of the City's four creek watersheds.  Whether you live close to a waterway or a mile away from it, we all live in a watershed.  What we do upstream affects our neighbors downstream, and vice versa.

What watershed do you live in?  Check out our Creek Map to find out.

In early 2010, the City completed a multi-year grant project to study the Alder Creek Watershed.  The Broadstone and Willow Springs neighborhoods, Gold Ridge Elementary School, most businesses along Iron Point Road, and the Palladio Mall are in this watershed.  Also, the land in the City’s Sphere of Influence south of Hwy 50 is in the Alder Creek Watershed.   Click here to get more information about this project, including the Watershed Management Action Plan, which recommends policies and projects intended to protect valuable natural resources as urban development proceeds into the future.

Folsom's Adopt a Creek/Trail (ACT) Program

The Adopt a Creek/Trail program (Folsom ACT) is a volunteer partnership between the Friends of Folsom Parkways (FOFP), the City of Folsom, and local residents to help monitor and maintain Folsom's creek trails and associated nature habitat.  The goal is to promote civic responsibility and community pride, while enhancing the quality of Folsom.  This program fosters understanding and public stewardship toward urban trails, parks, open space, and natural resources, including our local creeks and watersheds.

Any individual or group can join the program, church groups, Scouts, schools, youth groups, civic organizations, and local businesses are all welcome to get involved.  Check the web site listing for the groups that have currently adopted areas.

Each ACT team is responsible for adopting a creek/trail section, for monitoring the natural conditions of the area, and for picking up trash.  Each team is also expected to participate in activities to control invasive non-native plants.  Support provided by the City of Folsom can include arranging for access to creek areas, providing staff for field visits and waste pickup and disposal, loaning field supplies, and providing maps and photocopying.

Click here for more information about Folsom ACT
.


Storm Drain System Maintenance

The City operates and maintains an extensive storm drainage system, including about 190 miles of pipe, 23 miles of natural drainage channels/creeks, 30 flood control and/or water quality detention basins and over 200 outfalls to creeks/rivers. The storm drain system is operated and maintained by the Public Works Streets Division



Stormwater Quality Program

Unlike water from our toilets and sinks, which is carried in the sanitary sewer system to the
Sacramento Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant, urban runoff in our storm drain system travels directly to our neighborhood creeks and the American River without treatment.  This means that oil and grease fromour cars and roadways, excess fertilizers from our lawns, and soapy residue from washing activities could be entering our creeks and river every day.

The City of Folsom is taking steps to combat urban runoff pollution to keep our waterways clean. Since 1990, the City has been a partner in the Sacramento Stormwater Quality Partnership along with the County of Sacramento and the Cities of Sacramento, Citrus Heights, Elk Grove, Galt and Rancho Cordova. Together, we are implementing a comprehensive program involving public outreach, construction and industrial controls, water quality monitoring and other activities designed to protect the health of our creeks and rivers for generations to come.


FAQ’s

How Does Water Pollution Occur?

Runoff water from our urban environment enters the American River every day. This water can carry pollutants directly to our rivers without treatment, where the pollutants can harm fish and wildlife and make the waterways unhealthy. Runoff is generated in two ways. First, as stormwater hits the ground during a rain event, it travels in streets and gutters to storm drain pipes or channels, picking up pollutants (such as oil and grease from cars) accumulated on our streets and other paved surfaces. Second, we generate water in the course of our everyday activities at work and at home. This water, such as excess runoff from lawn watering, dirty rinse water from washing down buildings and pavement, and wastewater from concrete work and painting, also makes its way into our storm drain pipes. From here, the polluted water empties into local creeks and rivers. Even pollution in the air ends up in our waterways after it rains. Ever notice how clear and fresh it feels the day after a storm?

How Can We Help Prevent This Pollution and Protect Our Environment?

We want to protect the health and beauty of our waterways for generations to come. Sacramento County residents use the American and Sacramento Rivers for drinking water, swimming, fishing and boating, so it's important that the water is as clean as possible. Animals, fish and plants also depend on clean water and healthy creek and river habitat for their survival. 

What watershed do you live in?  Use our  creek map to find out where runoff from your neighborhood goes.  Then visit your local creek and explore the trails on foot or bike to see firsthand the natural beauty we are trying to protect.

Here’s what you can do to help prevent water pollution in Folsom:

Household Hazardous Waste

  • Properly dispose of waste through Folsom's convenient service (www.FolsomHazmat.com)
  • Use the least toxic products for cleaning and garden maintenance
  • Clean latex paint brushes in a sink, not outdoors

Automotive

  • Maintain your vehicle to keep fluids from dripping onto the pavement
  • Properly dispose of auto fluids and batteries (see www.FolsomHazmat.com)
  • When washing your car, use as little water and soap as possible to reduce runoff and pollution, or better yet, use a commercial car wash

Landscaping, Gardening & Construction

  • Inform your landscape, construction and pool contractor about proper methods to prevent pollution
  • Sweep surfaces before hosing down to keep debris out of the storm drain
  • Consider safer alternatives to chemical pesticides and fertilizers. Use sparingly and not before rain
  • Compost or recycle yard waste when possible
  • To properly drain pools, spas and fountains, follow the tips on the city's website

Pets

  • Pick up pet waste from yards or streets to prevent harmful bacteria from getting into our waterways

Folsom's Stormwater Ordinance

The City of Folsom has been issued a Stormwater Permit by the State which requires that we conduct a broad range of activities to prevent urban runoff pollution in the City. the city's Stormwater Ordinance (Folsom Municipal Code 8.70) was established to protect the quality of water in the storm drain system. It is illegal to discharge many kinds of pollutants into our local storm drains, detention basins, creeks and rivers. The following are some of the activities in our City that could be sending pollution to our creeks and rivers, along with the pollutants we are concerned about:

The City of Folsom has been issued a Stormwater Permit by the State which requires that we conduct a broad range of activities to prevent urban runoff pollution in the City. the city's Stormwater Ordinance (Folsom Municipal Code 8.70) was established to protect the quality of water in the storm drain system. It is illegal to discharge many kinds of pollutants into our local storm drains, detention basins, creeks and rivers. The following are some of the activities in our City that could be sending pollution to our creeks and rivers, along with the pollutants we are concerned about: The City of Folsom has been issued a Stormwater Permit by the State which requires that we conduct a broad range of activities to prevent urban runoff pollution in the City. The City's Stormwater Ordinance (Folsom Municipal Code 8.70) was established to protect the quality of water in the storm drain system. It is illegal to discharge many kinds of pollutants into  our local storm drains, detention basins, creeks and rivers. The following are some of the activities in our City that could be sending pollution to our creeks and rivers, along with the pollutants we are concerned about:

  • Washing down pavement, buildings and roofs - accumulated pollutants on the surface, detergents, chemicals, acids
  • Handling and storing wastes and chemicals - hazardous (e.g., toxic, flammable, combustible) wastes, industrial and household chemicals, solid waste (trash)
  • Littering and illegal dumping - trash, cigarette butts, food products, household wastes
  • Maintaining landscaped areas - trimmings, grass, pesticides, herbicides, fertilizers, excess irrigation runoff.
  • Painting - Paints, cleaners, solvents and acids
  • Installing concrete and stucco - sand, gravel, cement mix, concrete slurry, solid chunks of concrete
  • Grading and clearing construction sites, hillsides and roadside areas - erosion in these areas can carry sediment and vegetative debris to storm drains and waterways
  • Cleaning and emptying swimming pools and fountains - chlorine, bleach, ammonia, detergent and acids
  • Caring for pets and animals - animal waste contains bacteria and viruses and should be cleaned up and disposed as solid waste
  • Illegal sanitary sewer cross-connections to storm drains, leaking portable toilets and septic systems - bacteria and viruses

Schools and Community Outreach

The City of Folsom works with the Sacramento Stormwater Quality Partnership to conduct many educational activities targeting schools, teachers, students and parents. Our HazMat team provides interactive classroom presentations to ninth-grade students in Folsom Middle and Folsom High Schools each year.  The City contracts with professional educators from the South Yuba River Citizens League to present interactive educational student assemblies to various other Folsom schools throughout the year. Contact us to inquire about presentations at your school.

When you visit the Folsom Zoo, don't forget to ask about and stop by the Stormwater Pollution Prevention Display. Learn how you can be the "solution to pollution" and help take care of our home...the planet earth!

Here are some links to other educational programs in the area:

    http://www.sacsplash.org
    http://www.beriverfriendly.net/

Planning a car wash fundraiser?

Click  here to view the City’s policy and guidelines to have an environmentally friendly car wash.

Business Compliance Program

The City of Folsom has an agreement with Sacramento County Environmental Management Department to conduct triennial stormwater compliance inspections at many businesses and industries in the city. For more information, visit:

    http://www.emd.saccounty.net/EnvComp/WP/Stormwater.html   

Pollution Prevention for Construction and New Development Projects

The City has established requirements for controlling pollution from construction and post-construction development activities. During construction, we are concerned with erosion that can contribute excess sediments to the storm drainage system and local creeks. Other pollutants can also be generated at construction sites, such as paints, solvents and concrete slurry. Dust is also a problem, since it can end up in local waterways. Most construction projects which involve grading, excavation, etc. are required to obtain a grading permit and comply with the provisions of the City's Grading Ordinance (Folsom Municipal Code 14.29). An erosion and sediment control plan is required as part of the Improvement Plans. The City currently uses erosion and sediment control specifications and standards. A copy may be obtained from the City’s Community Development Department.

In addition to complying with the City’s requirements, construction projects in Folsom disturbing one acre or more need to obtain coverage under the State Water Resources Control Board's General Construction Stormwater Permit. Failure to get a general permit could result in notices of violation and significant fines. The general construction permit requires preparation of a detailed stormwater pollution prevention plan (SWPPP) for your site. This plan must be available on site for review by City or State inspectors upon request. The general construction permit also requires you to conduct regular inspections of your best management practices before, after and during storm events.

The City employs a full-time Stormwater Inspector to inspect construction projects in the City for compliance with the City's stormwater regulations, conduct enforcement as necessary, and respond to incidents involving illegal discharges to the City’ storm drain system or local creeks and rivers.

Available educational materials for construction site operators:

  • Painting Without Polluting
  • Pintar Sin Contaminar (Spanish Language "Painting Without Polluting")
  • Concrete and Creeks Don't Mix
  • El Concreto y Los Rios no se Mezclan (Spanish Language "Concrete and Creeks Don't Mix")
  • Protecting Water Quality - Construction and Small Building Sites

    Download a copy of our brochures by clicking here or Contact Us for a hard copy.

    New Development and Redevelopment

    New development and redevelopment projects in the city offer a unique opportunity to design sites in a manner which minimizes pollution and impacts to the environment. The City of Folsom requires most of these projects to integrate stormwater quality treatment controls into the project design. The intent is to ensure that pollutants in site runoff are reduced to the maximum extent practicable for the life of the project. The City works closely with the Stormwater Quality Partnership to ensure that design standards are consistant from agency to agency, to the extent possible. The agencies collaborated on the Stormwater Quality Design Manual for Sacramento and South Placer Regions, published May 2007. For more information, see the following link:      http://www.beriverfriendly.net/newdevelopment

    Reporting Maintenance or Pollution Problems

    Call Folsom's Public Works Department, Streets Division to report maintenance, flooding, and pollution problems. After hours, a caller will be directed to leave a message, or to call police dispatch in the event of an emergency:

    Folsom's Public Works, Streets Division (916) 355-8344
    Call Folsom's Hazmat Hotline if a discharge or spill contains hazardous material.
    Folsom's Hazmat Hotline (916) 355-8397 Resources For More Information

    Sacramento Stormwater Quality Partnership

    Educational Brochures and Documents

    City of Folsom Creek Awareness Brochure

    City of Folsom Courtesy Notice Door Hanger

    Additional documents, below, can be obtained by linking to the following address:

           http://beriverfriendly.net

  • Stormwater compliance for Commercial Auto Washing and Detailing Businesses
  • Pool Water Pollutes-Dispose of it Properly
  • Stormwater Compliance for Auto Body Repair & Painting
  • Painting without Polluting
  • Pintar Sin Contaminar (Spanish Language "Painting Without Polluting")
  • Concrete and Creeks Don't Mix
  • El Concreto y Los Rios no se Mezclan (Spanish Language "Concrete and Creeks Don't Mix")
  • Please Don't Feed the Fish - Waste Disposal Guidelines for food Handling Facilities
  • You are the Solution...to Stormwater Pollution!
  • Usted es la solucion...a la contaminacion! (Spanish Language "You are the Solution...to Stormwater Pollution")
  • Water Quality Best Management Practices for community Car Wash Events
  • Best Management Practices for Pressure Washing and Surface Cleaning
  • Protecting Water Quality - Construction and Small Building Sites

    Download a copy of these brochures or Contact Us or come into the Public Works Department for a hard copy of these materials:

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